Re: Burn Mark on Linoleum Floor


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Posted by Paul O'Dell on July 25, 19100 at 14:06:34:

In Reply to: Re: Burn Mark on Linoleum Floor posted by Dave on July 24, 19100 at 16:00:52:

: : : Any ideas about how to repair a burn mark to a linoleum kitchen floor? Do I need to cut and replace the individual tiles that were burned?

: :
: : Hi Steve,

: : Yes, You need to get a seam sealing kit from the manufacturer (or seam sealert and botttle). Cut out a aquare from a extra piece of material (make sure material direction is the same as on the floor), then use that piece as a template to cut the piece out on the floor. Work slowly and precisely as you can ruin more of your floor VERY EASILY. After the area is cut, scraped, and cleaned, apply glue to floor (using recommended trowel notches and adhesive), insert vinyl piece, rub till down and smooth with damp cloth, allow to dry, apply seam sealer per manufacturers directions.

: : Good Luck

: Hey Steve,
: Paul has some good advice there. You didn't mention however just how big this burn hole was or what brand of linoleum you are working with.
: If I may Paul, I might suggest one thing different. If Steve is just repairing the burn mark and not replacing the whole tile...instead of cutting a square or any other type of symetrical shape, I've found better success of "hiding" the repair with using odd shapes. Such as an oblong oval or the likes, especially if there is any pattern or marble effect in the lino.
: Also, if you don't get that perfect fit Steve, there are still remedies. Use that "phoo-phoo goo"
: mixture before Paul? LOL It's done wonders for repairs I've done for people. Such a simple process if you know what your're doing and customer and installer usaually part with smiles on their faces : )
: Good luck Steve,
: Dave

Hi Steve,

: : Yes, You need to get a seam sealing kit from the manufacturer (or seam sealert and botttle). Cut out a aquare from a extra piece of material (make sure material direction is the same as on the floor), then use that piece as a template to cut the piece out on the floor. Work slowly and precisely as you can ruin more of your floor VERY EASILY. After the area is cut, scraped, and cleaned, apply glue to floor (using recommended trowel notches and adhesive), insert vinyl piece, rub till down and smooth with damp cloth, allow to dry, apply seam sealer per manufacturers directions.

: : Good Luck


: Hey Steve,
: Paul has some good advice there. You didn't mention however just how big this burn hole was or what brand of linoleum you are working with.
: If I may Paul, I might suggest one thing different. If Steve is just repairing the burn mark and not replacing the whole tile...instead of cutting a square or any other type of symetrical shape, I've found better success of "hiding" the repair with using odd shapes. Such as an oblong oval or the likes, especially if there is any pattern or marble effect in the lino.
: Also, if you don't get that perfect fit Steve, there are still remedies. Use that "phoo-phoo goo"
: mixture before Paul? LOL It's done wonders for repairs I've done for people. Such a simple process if you know what your're doing and customer and installer usaually part with smiles on their faces : )
: Good luck Steve,
: Dave


LOL DAVE !! POO-POO-GOO ... yes i have done that on occasion on selected projects and most of the time they did turn out fine, must be the perfectionist in me, i think all patterned sheet goods repairs should be invisible. Most of my lino/sheet vinyl repairs have been using the "patch" method. There is not a PATTERNED vinyl out there i can not make look relatively invisible except for the sealer glossiness, but then again I have been doing these repairs for quite some time. lol ... poo-poo-goo !
If your materials is non-patterned (ask retailer or manufacturer as some may look patterned but are not and visa-versa) or if the burn is very small and not deeply into the material, the cover-up, poo-poo-goo method may work fine.

Also, ask the manufacturer about a "repair kit" for the flooring in question, or go to a big-box store (yikes!) and ask around the flooring dept. One other thing if i may, I forgot to mention that if the material is perimeter-bonded (perimifloor, interflex, glued at seams and edges only) you must work quickly and apply adhesive under the existing material on the floor, and you also may want to use "duct tape" to slightly stretch the material to bring the 4 sides of seams together. If the area with the burn is perimeter-bonded AND on an area that has perimeter-bone adhesive, some of the wood sub-floor may come up with the piece(if a wood substrate). Be careful in pulling material up to keep this from happening or you may need to patch the voids where the wood was with an approved patching compound. We would use (c)Ardex, Feather Finish.

Good Luck





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